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MACH – Various MACH Related Definitions

 

Machmeter

MACH -Named after Ernst Mach, a 19th century Austrian physicist, is the ratio of an aircraft’s true speed as compared to the local speed of sound at a given time or place.

MACH number (MACH Speed) is a decimal number (M) representing the true airspeed (TAS) relationship to the local speed of sound (e.g., TAS 75 percent (.75M) of the speed of sound where 100 percent of the speed of sound is represented as MACH 1 (1.0M)). The speed of sound varies with temperature. Under standard temperature conditions of 15 °C, the speed of sound at sea level is 661 knots. At 40,000 feet, where the temperature is –55 °C, the speed of sound decreases to 574 knots. In high-speed flight and/or high-altitude flight, the measurement of speed is expressed in terms of a “Mach number”—the ratio of the true airspeed of the aircraft to the speed of sound in the same atmospheric conditions. An aircraft traveling at the speed of sound is traveling at Mach 1.0.

MACH number (Critical) is the free stream MACH number at which local sonic flow such as buffet, airflow separation, and shock waves becomes evident. These phenomena occur above the critical MACH number, often referred to as MACH crit.

Aircraft speed regimes are defined approximately as follows:

  • Subsonic—Mach numbers below 0.75
  • Transonic—Mach numbers from 0.75 to 1.20
  • Supersonic—Mach numbers from 1.20 to 5.00
  • Hypersonic—Mach numbers above 5.00

MACH Buffet is the airflow separation behind a shock-wave pressure barrier caused by airflow over flight surfaces exceeding the speed of sound.

Mach buffet is a function of the speed of the airflow over the wing—not necessarily the speed of the aircraft.

Any time that too great a lift demand is made on the wing, whether from too fast an airspeed or from too high an AOA near the MMO, the “high-speed” buffet occurs. There are also occasions when the buffet can be experienced at much lower speeds known as the “low-speed Mach buffet.” An aircraft flown at a speed too slow for its weight and altitude necessitating a high AOA is the most likely situation to cause a low-speed Mach buffet. This very high AOA has the effect of increasing airflow velocity over the upper surface of the wing until the same effects of the shock waves and buffet occur as in the high-speed buffet situation. The AOA of the wing has the greatest effect on inducing the Mach buffet at either the high-speed or low-speed boundaries for the aircraft.

The conditions that increase the AOA, the speed of the airflow over the wing, and chances of Mach buffet are:

  • High altitudes—the higher an aircraft flies, the thinner the air and the greater the AOA required to produce the lift needed to maintain level flight.
  • Heavy weights—the heavier the aircraft, the greater the lift required of the wing, and all other things being equal, the greater the AOA.
  • G loading—an increase in the G loading on the aircraft has the same effect as increasing the weight of the aircraft. Whether the increase in G forces is caused by turns, rough control usage, or turbulence, the effect of increasing the wing’s AOA is the same.
  • High altitudes—the higher an aircraft flies, the thinner the air and the greater the AOA required to produce the lift needed to maintain level flight.• Heavy weights—the heavier the aircraft, the greater the lift required of the wing, and all other things being equal, the greater the AOA.• G loading—an increase in the G loading on the aircraft has the same effect as increasing the weight of the aircraft. Whether the increase in G forces is caused by turns, rough control usage, or turbulence, the effect of increasing the wing’s AOA is the same.

MACH (or Aileron) Buzz is a term used to describe a shock-induced flow separation of the boundary layer air before reaching the ailerons.

MACH Meter is an instrument designed to indicate MACH number. MACH indicating capability is incorporated into the airspeed indicator(s) of current generation turbine-powered aircraft capable of MACH range speeds.

MACH Tuck is the result of an aftward shift in the center of lift causing a nose down pitching moment.

MMO (MACH; maximum operation) is an airplane’s maximum certificated MACH number. Any excursion past MMO, whether intentional or accidental, may cause induced flow separation of boundary layer air over the ailerons and elevators of an airplane and result in a loss of control surface authority and/or control surface buzz or snatch.

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